By Gareth Johnson | @GTVlondon 
Photo © www.flickr.com/photos/secretnudes


Most guys I know don’t hesitate to take intimate photos or videos of themselves – either solo or with someone else.

The motivation for this isn’t new – we want to capture a moment, to show ourselves in different ways, but developments in technology over the years have dramatically enhanced our ability to do so. Your phone is always within easy reach, it’s simple to use and it takes great quality photos and video. Capturing and sharing those intimate moments has never been easier.

Keeping control of those images is not so easy. From the widely publicised examples of celebrities whose cloud storage accounts have been hacked, to the private exchanges on dating apps that somehow go public, or the more malicious practice of revenge porn.

‘Revenge porn’ is a subject that has received a fair bit of coverage in the UK recently, with new legislation enacted that specifically seeks to punish perpetrators. Other countries around the world have introduced similar legislation – the UK law carries a penalty of up to two years in jail.

The legislation defines revenge porn as: “Photographs or films which show people engaged in sexual activity or depicted in a sexual way or with their genitals exposed, where what is shown would not usually be seen in public.”

While most of the reported victims of revenge porn are women, there have been a number of cases involving gay men.

The scenario usually involves a messy break-up. People tend to do extreme things when they are experiencing turbulent emotions. Threatening to publicly share personal information without consent is a form of abuse; it’s controlling behaviour, trying to frighten someone into submission.

The consequences for victims can be extreme – once your intimate moments have gone public, it’s pretty much impossible to erase them. Reputations can be damaged, relationships undermined, and careers ruined.

While the new legislation in the UK may deter and punish revenge porn, it isn’t able to minimise the impact on the victims.

I take most of my life advice from Judge Judy. She was recently asked about the leaking of nude photos of celebrities such as Jennifer Lawrence and Kate Upton. According to Judge Judy:

“If you don’t want to see a picture of yourself out there, then it would be my best advice not to take them.”

It’s a logic that is hard to argue with. However the reality is that we take photos because we want to, because that moment is important to us, and that moment says something about us.

Revenge porn is now illegal and punishable, but the security of your intimate photos and videos remains your responsibility. 

Messy break-ups are hard enough. Don’t add to the drama by exposing yourself to revenge porn. 


REVENGE PORN: WHAT YOU CAN AND CAN NOT DO

People who maliciously share sexually explicit pictures of former partners will face prosecution under new laws.

Revenge porn – the distribution of a private sexual image of someone without their consent and with the intention of causing them distress – will be made a specific offence in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, and has been passed through Parliament.

The change will cover the sharing of images both online and offline. It will mean that images posted to social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter will be covered by the offence, as well as those that are shared via text message. Images shared via email, on a website or the distribution of physical copies will also be covered. Those convicted will face a maximum sentence of two years in prison.

The offence will cover photographs or films which show people engaged in sexual activity or depicted in a sexual way or with their genitals exposed, where what is shown would not usually be seen in public. Victims and others will be able to report offences to the police to investigate. Officers will work with the Crown Prosecution Service to take forward cases for prosecution.

Those found to have committed a sexual offence can continue to be prosecuted under existing legislation, which can lead to sentences of up to 14 years in prison.

What you can do:

If someone sends you pics of themselves naked you are fully entitled to keep the image for your own private use. This incudes anyone and not just someone you used to be in a relationship with. It’s perfectly legal to keep the pics for yourself.

What you can’t do: 

If someone sends you naked pictures of themselves and you decide to share them with others on the internet, email or even offline this is now illegal and you could be prosecuted. This includes:

  • Pictures your current or ex-partner sent you.
  • Images sent via email.
  • Images sent via social media.
  • Images sent via dating/sex apps.

It is now also illegal for you to take naked pictures of someone and put them online without consent. 

My ex put my dick pics on Tumblr:

This is now illegal. You can report him to the police if he refuses to take the images down. 


This article was taken from FS #147: CHEMSEX EXPOSED


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